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What is Primary biliary cholangitis

Primary Biliary Cholangitis is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the bile ducts of the liver. This blocks the flow of bile, which damages the liver cells and leads to scarring called cholangitis. The cause of inflamed bile ducts in the liver is not known. However, Primary Biliary Cholangitis is an autoimmune disorder. That means your body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. The disease more commonly affects middle-aged women. Long-term bile obstruction is believed to lead to liver cholangitis. The disease may be linked to autoimmune disorders such as: celiac disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon, sicca syndrome (dry eyes or mouth), and thyroid disease. More than half of patients have no symptoms at the time of diagnosis. Symptoms most often come on slowly and may include: abdominal pain, enlarged liver, fatigue, fatty deposits under the skin, fatty stools, itching, jaundice, and soft yellow spots on the eyelid. The outcome can vary. If the condition is not treated, most patients will die without a liver transplant. About a quarter of patients who have had the disease for 10 years will have liver failure. Doctors can now use a statistical model to predict the best time to do the transplant. Other diseases such as hypothyroidism and anemia can also develop.

Related Autoimmune Patient Groups

American Liver Foundation
American Liver Foundation
Global Liver Inst
Global Liver Institute

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